INVOLUNTARY ADMISSION-CONNECTICUT

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"The law permits the involuntary commitment of people with psychiatric disabilities who are either dangerous to themselves or others or gravely disabled. A gravely disabled person is someone who may suffer harm because he or she fails to provide for basic human needs and refuses to accept necessary hospitalization."

Read more at: Office of Legislative Research Report # 2013-R-0031 - Involuntary Civil Commitment and Patients' Rights
and at the Connecticut Judicial Branch Law Libraries website page on "Connecticut Law About Commitment (Voluntary/Involuntary)"

Connecticut Legal Rights Project (CLRP0 is a statewide non-profit agency which provides free legal services to low income adults with psychiatric disabilities, who reside in hospitals or the community, on matters related to their treatment, recovery, and civil rights. For more information go to: http://www.clrp.org/legal-issues-we-handle/psychiatric-inpatient-hospital-issues/

Connecticut is one of only six states that do not authorize involuntary treatment in the community, often called "assisted outpatient treatment (AOT)" or "outpatient commitment." Such laws often make it possible for people with mental illness to receive medical care before they are so ill they require hospitalization or experience other consequences of non-treatment. For more information go to: http://www.treatmentadvocacycenter.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=202&Itemid=137

 

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SOURCES: Office of Legislative Research Report # 2013-R-0031 - Involuntary Civil Commitment and Patient's Rights, Treatment Advocacy Center, Connecticut Legal Rights Project; Connecticut Judicial Branch Law Libraries Website
PREPARED BY: 211/kq
CONTENT LAST REVIEWED: March2014